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NC REGION REPORTS

REGION COUNTIES -- Cameron, Centre, Clearfield, Clinton, Elk, Jefferson, Lycoming, McKean, Montour, Northumberland, Potter, Snyder, Tioga, Union (County Guide)


December 4, 2019

REMINDER – Mandatory Cold Weather Life Jacket wear began on November 1, 2019 and ends on April 30, 2020 for all canoes, kayaks and boats under 16 feet in length.  Learn more here - https://www.fishandboat.com/Boat/BoatingRegulations/Pages/MandatoryPFD.aspx

Clinton County

Water levels are good across the County.  Water temperatures are dipping and the scenery is beautiful.  Many anglers are now hunting, which means you could have your favourite fishing area all to yourself if you choose to venture out!

REMINDER – If you are heading to the stream, consider wearing fluorescent orange during hunting season.

Ice anglers are anxiously awaiting the first signs of ice.  Remember, before heading out on the ice think about safety first!  Check the ice conditions before heading out, wear a float coat or certified Personal Floatation device, be sure to have a whistle, ice awls and let family/friends know where you are going and for how long.

West Branch Susquehanna River – Anglers continue to catch Musky using live bait, lures and large flies.

Fishing Creek – The water temperature is in the 40s.  The water is up a bit from the recent rain/snow event.  The water is still clear.

Anglers continue to catch trout using nymph patterns including peach/orange egg, flashback pheasant tail, Frenchie and large stonefly nymphs. 

A few anglers are catching trout using streamer patterns that are black or olive.

Centre County

Spring Creek – The water temperature is holding in the 40s. The recent rain and snow event bumped water flow up.  The water has a little bit of color and is fishing well.

Anglers continue to catch trout using peach/orange egg patterns, sow bugs, scuds, walt's worm and bead head pheasant tails.

Anglers are also catching trout using streamer patterns.  Streamer colors that are working include olive or black patterns.

November 27, 2019

REMINDER – Mandatory Cold Weather Life Jacket wear began on November 1, 2019 and ends on April 30, 2020 for all canoes, kayaks and boats under 16 feet in length.  Learn more here - https://www.fishandboat.com/Boat/BoatingRegulations/Pages/MandatoryPFD.aspx

REMINDER – Anglers are reminded that fall is the time of year when Brook and Brown Trout spawn.  When fishing, make sure you are mindful of where you step to avoid stepping on trout egg nests, also known as trout redds.  The gravel in a trout redd will appear light in color/clean gravel.  Most look like oval or round areas of clean gravel.  Some are not much bigger than a frying pan size, others may be larger.

Clinton County

West Branch Susquehanna River – Anglers are catching Musky using live bait, lures and large flies.

Bald Eagle Creek -Anglers are catching trout using lures and streamer patterns.

Fishing Creek – The water temperature is in the 40s.  The water is clear and flowing at an average level for this time of year.

Anglers are catching trout using nymph patterns including peach/orange egg, flashback pheasant tail, Frenchie, hares ear and large stonefly nymphs.  A few anglers are catching trout using streamer patterns that are black or olive.

Lycoming County

Pine Creek -  Anglers are catching trout using nymphs, streamers and egg patterns.  Fish the deep pools and runs.

West Branch Susquehanna River – Anglers are catching Musky using live bait, lures and large fly patterns.

Centre County

Spring Creek – The water temperature is holding in the 40s. The water level and color are great for fishing this time of year. 

Anglers are catching trout using peach/orange egg patterns, sow bugs, scuds, walt's worm and bead head pheasant tails.

Anglers are also catching trout using streamer patterns as well.  Streamer colors that are working include olive or black patterns.

 Reports compiled by Amidea Daniel (RA-FBNCFISHNRPT@pa.gov), Northcentral Regional Education Specialist, using information provided by Waterways Conservation Officers, Area Fisheries Managers and other PFBC staff.​​